Meta-Blogging: November 2005 Archives

Roundup

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Stuart Taylor examines the claim that Judge Alito is outside the mainstream, concluding that he's well within both the general American mainstream and the legal/judicial mainstream. [Hat tip: SCOTUSBlog]

William Wainwright has updated his Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy article on Jonathan Edwards, originally authored in 2002. Most Edwards fans don't look at his philosophy as much as other aspects of his work, so I very much appreciate when a philosopher takes an interest in the first great American philosopher. Wainwright has done a lot to motivate thinking of Edwards as up there with the great early moderns, and I have to agree. Edwards and G.W. Leibniz are by far my favorite early modern philosophers. Edwards anticipated both Berkeley and Hume in interesting ways.

Brooksilver at The Lord of the Blog Rings has a nice post about Christian parables within The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. I'm beginning to realize how little I remember from those books. I must have been 10 or so when I read them. I highly recommend his blog as a whole, by the way. I discovered it during his recent hiatus when he wasn't posting anything, but he's been a good friend for years, and I intend to read everything he posts now that he's back to blogging.

Two more pictures of the kids: Isaiah prim and proper and Sophia's underwear hat

Christian Carnival XCVII

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The 97th Christian Carnival (part one, part two) is at Thought Renewal. The next episode will be tomorrow, so get your entries in by midnight tonight.

Christian Carnival XCVIII Plug

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The 98th Christian Carnival will be this week, hosted at Cadmusings. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers. For examples of past carnivals, see Matt Jones's list of previous Christian Carnivals.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Trackback Ethics

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I've encountered a strange trackback dilemma. It's standard blogging convention that you don't send trackbacks to a blog post unless you link to that blog post. See this post on the history of trackback for an explanation of its original purpose, and see Outside the Beltway, The Moderate Voice, and Eternal Recurrence for standard accounts of what not to do and why. Most bloggers who pay attention will delete any trackback that doesn't give any reference to their post but is merely sent to garner attention without repaying the compliment. I deleted a trackback within the last week that fit this description exactly. Someone wanted to draw attention to his blog, so he was sending trackbacks to any posts about the subject he was writing about without discussing anything on those blogs and without linking to it. I resolved to write a post about the ethics of trackback so I could point to an encapsulation of the issues really easily. Then the post I intended took a turn for the more complicated.

In the last few days I've received trackbacks on these two posts. The posts they point to do link to the posts in question, and they describe the posts here as related blog posts. The only problem is that they're clearly not related in any important way. One is a book review of a novel, and it points to a book review Abednego wrote here of something completely unrelated. One is about dating Jewish men, and it points to a post of mine about the dating of the when the Edomite nation existed.

I'm of two minds on this. It seems like a genuine abuse of trackback and deserving of deletion, but the posts in question do link here. So what does standard blogging convention have to say about such a situation? My impression is that it wouldn't be wrong to delete these trackbacks and to institute a policy of deleting all such trackbacks, but I'd like to hear from others before I do so. Ideally you will give arguments for your view. A stronger view is even possible. One might think I have a moral obligation to delete these trackbacks if leaving them up endorses the immoral flouting of standard blog conventions. So, any thoughts?

Roundup

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Blogs4God has President George Washington's Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1789.

More Ethan pictures: Sam took him outside to play with the fallen leaves.

Proto-Kaw (the band Kerry Livgren of Kansas has reformed based on an earlier incarnation of Kansas that never released anything until this decade) has a new album coming out in February, called The Wait of Glory. We had the pleasure of seeing them and meeting them all this summer, and it was one of the highlights of the last decade for me. The lyrics for the Wait of Glory are up now. I can't wait to hear it. Everything I've heard is that it's even better than their last album Before Became After, which was one of Livgren's best works.

For some really perverse fun, see A Night at the Roddenberry. [Hat tip: The Gnu]

Speaking of the Gnu, he has a response to a few of Scott Adams's comments on Intelligent Design (see Abednego's post). I think his point about Crick and Watson is particularly interesting.

The 97th Christian Carnival will be this week, hosted at Thought Renewal. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers. For examples of past carnivals, see Matt Jones's list of previous Christian Carnivals.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Roundup

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Christian Carnival XCVI is at Jordan's View.

Have you heard about the 18-year-old elected mayor as a write-in candidate? [Hat tip: Mark Olson]

Ben Witherington reviews Anne Rice's new novel about Jesus' childhood. I can't help but mention that he also gives Firefly and Serenity a thumbs up.

Here's Ethan a few years ago looking like his ducky (that's old ducky, which his mean aunties lost at the store 723 days ago; the new one has a much bigger bill, which I hope his mouth never looks like).

The Search Goes On

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How people are getting here isn't really becoming more interesting, because some great sitemeter catches have been around since I first started looking, but there's always something new:

how to silence your conscience
I'm well aware that we can come up with make ourselves feel better about our evil, but doesn't it defeat the purpose if you're explicitly aware that that's what you're doing?

philosophy insult
Do you mean like saying an argument is rhetoric? That's got a long-standing tradition as an insult in philosophy. Or perhaps this is supposed to include the more recent practice of calling something spooky because it isn't the kind of explanation you'd like there to be. It's almost become a technical term at this point.

why are there no laws against children who view porn
What do you want to do, lock them up?

Sick and Searches

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I've managed to get violently ill after already already having been pretty sick (and then perfectly better) twice in the past week. This third time is the worst. I hope to post something with more content tomorrow. In the meantime, here are some more searches.

sitting duck period of presidency
Well, if the lame duck period is supposed to be after the next president-elect has already won the election, I suppose the sitting duck period must be during the election itself?

Black women who marry white men to have lighter skinned kids
You know, some people do marry for pretty stupid reasons, but I have a hard time believing very many people will marry someone simply to have lighter-skinned kids. This is especially so in a culture where you get teased for acting or looking too white. Most people actually want their kids to look like them, and this isn't just true of white people. Anyone who works in the field of adoption will tell you that.

john kerry isnt a good president
I suppose not. Of course, he isn't a bad president, either.

The 96th Christian Carnival will be this week, hosted at Jordan's View. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers. For examples of past carnivals, see Matt Jones's list of previous Christian Carnivals.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

condoleeza rice supports the book and theory 'the bell curve'
I very much doubt it, though I'm not sure if she's even said anything on the subject, ever. If she's familiar with the issues, I'd expect her to take Sowell's views, which accept 90% of the book on the non-racial issues but not the stuff on race and the assumption that it's based on genetics. If she's not too familiar with the book or the conservative literature on it, she probably just accepts the standard line that it's psuedo-science.

spongebob jew
Last I knew, he was a sponge. Sponges are not Jews. They're invertebrates.

reese witherspoon black ancestry
Yeah, I guess I see what you're getting at. I'm surprised no one else has drawn that connection.

Roundup

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Christian Carnival XCV is at Eternal Revolution.

Mark Roberts has finished his 30-part series Are the New Testament Gospels Reliable? I mentioned it before, when he started it. I haven't gotten through the whole thing yet, but what I've read so far has been excellent. I highly recommend it.

Here's an interesting study on the differences between men and women's responses to humor. Not at all what I would have expected. [Hat tip: Orin Kerr]

Eugene Volokh takes on the suggestion that Judge Alito thinks private ownership of machine guns should be legal. The best part is where the same line of reasoning makes Justice O'Connor out to favor violence against women.

Finally, Sam's put up a host of pictures since the last time I pointed any out. There's the salamander in the driveway. Sophia meets spaghetti. It's been warm, so we've still got some excellent fall foliage. Isaiah's still dodging cameras. Ethan enjoys the weather. Finally, Sophia's beginning to look a lot like Ethan did at her age.

The 95th Christian Carnival will be this week, hosted at Eternal Revolution. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers. For examples of past carnivals, see Matt Jones's list of previous Christian Carnivals.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Am I Sensing a Theme Here?

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I've been getting strange searches lately. There have been still been quite a few wondering what nationality Samuel Alito is, as if he could be a federal judge without being a U.S. citizen. The president isn't going to appoint a foreigner to the U.S. Supreme Court. One trend within the searches of late is represented well by the following three:

foreplay a sin
I sure hope you meant extra-marital foreplay. Anyone who thinks foreplay is intrinsically sinful needs a brain transplant. As for extra-marital foreplay, what do you think my wife would think if I told her I was engaging in foreplay with someone else?

forced sexual consent
I'm trying to figure out what that's even supposed to mean.

redefining adultery to include oral sex
I sincerely hope this was a typo and was supposed to say "exclude". Otherwise, my sincere hope is that this person is not and never will be married.

Roundup

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Christian Carnival XCIV is at Wittenberg Gate. Dory is in need of future hosts, so if you're interested follow her link at the top of the post. The Bible Archive is doing a series on Genesis. I especially want to direct your attention to his nice post on what Genesis 1 does say. All the debates about how to interpret the days and whether it's consistent with evolution easily distract from what the passage is about to begin with, and Rey brings our attention back to that. If you want to see his summary on those other issues, it's here, but why is our focus so often not what the focus of the text is? Walter Snyder has a good explanation of how it is that Bible publishers can justify charging royalties for the use of what is God's word (and thus should be free). [Hat tip: ESV Bible Blog] Belgium declares names and titles to be no longer capitalized. Well, I guess it's just politically incorrect names and titles. Actually, they've just singled out 'christ' and 'jew'* just to show how arbitrary they can be. Or is this arbitrary? [Hat tip: Sam] *Well, for 'Jew' it's only when the reference is religious rather than ethnic; if ethnic, it's still capitalized.

Roundup

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At Real Clear Theology, you can find excerpts of D.A. Carson and Douglas Moo's section on the New Perspective on Paul in their new edition of An Introduction to the New Testament, a book I would wholeheartedly recommend. [Hat tip: Rebecca]

Tyler Williams looks at witches in the Bible and traces out the origin of our modern conception of a witch. The first comment (the only one so far) is priceless.

Ed Feser at Right Reason takes apart Simon Blackburn's critique of Elizabeth Anscombe's natural law theory. [Hat tip: Philosophers' Carnival XXI] Standout quote:

Blackburn appears to be the sort of philosopher who, as an undergraduate, read a few excerpts from Anselm and Aquinas in some textbook, along with the standard potted “refutations��? deriving from Hume and Kant, and never looked back – assuming ever since that no one could seriously believe that the existence of God could be demonstrated philosophically. He shows no awareness of the extent to which many of these standard objections are based on caricatures or oversimplifications of the traditional theistic arguments, nor any appreciation of the work done in defense of them by contemporary philosophers of religion like Plantinga and Swinburne, much less by analytical Thomists like John Haldane, whose work is most relevant to the matters presently at issue.

I'm not quite sure what to make of this. It doesn't seem good for those who have insisted that Bush really wanted a war no matter what.

Senators Lindsey Graham (SC) and Mike DeWine (OH) were among the seven Republicans in the Gang of 14 who conspired to prevent Democrats from filibustering President Bush's judicial nominees and Republicans from using what's been called the nuclear option to remove the ability to filibuster judicial nominees. Since there are 55 Republicans, and 50 (+ Vice President Cheney's tie-breaking vote) would be needed to change the filibuster rule, only 6 Republicans were needed for the Gang of 14. They had 7. They now have at most 5, at least with respect to Samuel Alito's nomination for the Supreme Court. Graham and DeWine have indicated that they would not allow a filibuster on this nomination. It remains to be seen if the 44 Democrats (plus independent Senator Jim Jeffords of VT) would have enough votes to filibuster to begin with. The Gang of 14 again needs 6 votes to oppose the filibuster. As far as I know, not one of them has indicated anything on how they will approach Alito's nomination.

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