Meta-Blogging: May 2005 Archives

I don't have a lot of time today, so I'm just putting forth a few searches and a few links.

kal-el brother of kal-el
I've gotten a search like this 2-3 times now. Does anyone have any idea what it's supposed to be finding?

good arguments for wolves
arguing what about wolves?

penal piercing
Some kinds of piercing are bad enough that I suppose they might serve as fitting punishments for particularly grievous crimes, but I'm not sure why someone would search for something like that with this expression. There might be better combinations of words for finding that. This search is just going to find something else and only the people writing about it who don't know how to spell.

Check of the Diet of {book} Worms, a site for reviews of Christian books, run by Tim Challies.

Philosophers' Carnival XIV is at Mumblings and Grumblings. It has one of my OrangePhilosophy posts, so I'm working on a roundup of it, which should appear by the end of the week.

Joseph Malozzi, writer and executive producer on both Stargate series, has a blog. There's not much there yet, but it could prove interesting.

More Pierce Pictures: Ethan asleep on the laundry piles in the crib and asleep on his dresser again

Technogypsy hosts the 71st
A Ticking Time Blog gives one more piece of evidence that
it's Brave New World that got the future right, not 1984.

Northern 'burbs blog gives some striking facts about the depths of American biblical illiteracy.

All kinds of time... shares some of my own worries about the language of rights as communicating something of our deserving of people to treat us well. As my comment expresses more fully, I think there are different senses of rights, and the broadest just involves whether someone or something is morally relevant at all. Still, I worry about those who treat rights as being about what someone is entitled to, as if we should expect people to do certain things for us.

Brandywine Books distinguishes between ambition of the hubristic sort and ambition in seeking excellence in what does.

A Physicist's Perspective will be hosting the 72nd Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Christian Carnival #70 (now from two weeks ago) at A Penitent Blogger. 70 scholars locked away in their monastic quarters arrived at the same final product independently of each other, and Penitens has posted it for us to see. My contribution is Chronology in I Samuel 16:1-18:5.

Pierce Pictures

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Sam has started a new blog for pictures, so she won't feel as if she's interrupting content on her main blog for these. It's called Pierce Pictures for now. It was a descriptive enough name that it would work for a URL even if we think up a better name eventually.

Some more ways to find my blog:

"jan cover" philosopher hair
Well, last I knew his hair was pretty long, but what was this search supposed to be trying to find?

support group against home school children
First of all, isn't a support group a group to support some group of people, not a group against a group of people? Second, why would anyone possibly form a group against a group of children, even if you don't like what people are doing to those children?

paul pierce sportron
Heh. It seems my shameless plugs for my dad's business have pulled in a hit from someone trying to find him. Of course, if they weren't willing to find where on my page the links they were looking for are then it wasn't worth it. It's kind of funny that the 'paul' comes from John Paul II, the 'pierce' comes from my name, not his, and the 'sportron' comes from the link that this person was looking for. They wouldn't have found me if they knew how to search within quotes. I can see that my links have done their job, though, because his pages are at the top for this search. Search engines really like blog links. It makes me wonder why this person clicked on my blog rather than the other sites, though. Weird.

The 138th Carnival of the Vanities is at Cynical Nation. My Interracial Couples in Popular Media is among the entries. Other posts of note:

Semicolon hosts the 69th Christian Carnival (yes, I'm well over a week behind). My contribution is ID is Science, Sort Of.

If you're interested in seeing a healthy theonomistic view that attempts to be grounded in biblical principles about government and about the difference between old covenant and new, you should check out By What Authority and By What Standard? at Wittenberg Gate. I'm not a theonomist, but I don't think Dory's version of theonomy (she doesn't call it that in this post, but she uses the term, with some cautionary notes, in the ensuing discussion here) is much like the sort of thing some people call by that name. This view is a kind of theonomy, though, and I think it's good to be aware that there's a much healthier version of it than what in compasrion seems like a caricature that some people manage to believe anyway.

Mr. Standfast connects being the salt of the earth with the beatitudes in an interesting way, looking at how the beatitudes reflect God's heart that he has made us to have, resulting in a call to live in a way reflecting what we are.

Attention Span has a great post about Rick Warren and the Purpose-Driven Phenomenon. It avoids extremism on both sides, something almost no one seems willing to try to do. What I really appreciate is the recognition of what Warren is doing right, what he's emphasizing that evangelicalism really needs to hear that enough people aren't hearing otherwise, and what he truly fails at in incredibly unfortunate ways. He also shows how you can take what he says for what it is and no more and thereby find it useful for what's good in it without sacrificing the things Warren can sacrifice at times.

A Physicist's Perspective reviews John MacArthur's The Gospel According to Jesus, the book that popularized the term 'Lordship Salvation', which is basically the view that becoming a Christian involves a commitment to Christ and not mere intellectual assent or emotional experience.

All Kinds of Time starts from some observations about the population shift to urban centers and then gives some thoughts on how Christians should respond, most especially by opposing the evangelical trend and moving to cities.

Cerulean Sanctum presents a new name for an old bad habit among Christians -- the Faith Bomber.

Technogypsy will be hosting the 71st Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Interesting searches have been fairly thin since last Tuesday, but I guess it works out because I've had very little time to comb the blogosophere for interesting stuff to go along with the interesting searches. Here's what I did notice:

yoda pornography
Fortunately for this person, Sitemeter only gave me three of the four numbers of the IP address, but I can say that it was someone in Australia.

Meaning of belching??
I didn't know it generally expressed any content. The double question mark is a nice touch. I'm not sure how it was supposed to help the search engine find the right answer, though.

why are black people so unintelligent
It may be related to why people who search Google for "why are black people so unintelligent" are so unintelligent.

A Penitent Blogger will be hosting the 70th Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

As has been the case a lot recently, I'm way behind with my carnival roundups, but here we go with last week's Christian Carnival, which is #68 and is hosted at Kentucky Packrat. My Ratzinger on Ecumenism With Protestants is among the entries. Christian Carnival LXIX is at Semicolon for those looking for the current one. That roundup will have to wait until I get through Best of Me Symphony LXXVI (the Monty Python edition), which I also have a post in, and Carnival of the Vanities CXXXVIII at Cynical Nation will also be in need of my attention, since I have a post there too, but that's last in the list because it appeared last.

New ways to find my blog:

topol of star trek
I've gotten so many of these now due to a commenter's misspelling of T'Pol's name that it's getting ridiculous, and I have to appease my conscience by trying to suck that traffic into a post making it clear that her name is T'Pol. You're going to find much better information on T'Pol if you spell her name correctly. Just to be clear: T'pol. It's not as if this spelling mechanism isn't a standard Vulcan convention, going all the way back to T'Pau in the original series (who showed up this season and met T'pol. Sorry. I needed to get one more correct spelling in there).

africans deleted from the bible
I suppose whoever did this deleting didn't do a good a job of it. There are plenty of Africans actually in the Bible.

self-refuting statements all statements are true
That's not self-refuting. It's just false.

New things to find elsewhere:

Semicolon will be hosting the 69th Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

The 67th Christian Carnival is at Wittenberg Gate. I put in my usual appearance with Preserving Form and Meaning in the TNIV. [Again, I'm well over a week behind, but I've been finishing up the last week of classes, it's grading season, and I've become a full-time dad for the past 40 hours or so. Now that I'm through this I can begin this week's.]

Ignorant searches landing at this blog since Monday (that successfully found very little of use):

name for native people in India
Umm ... Indians? At least that's the most general term. There are more specific ethnic minorities who are also native, but I think they're Indians too. It's not clear from the search which one it was supposed to be referring to.

How many misdiagnosis were there in 2004
Do you think God intends to report the exact number of times someone gets a disagnosis wrong to someone who both has a website and wants to put the information online?

africa mindset culture
So are Germans are as bad as most Americans in thinking of Africa as a country with one culture and mindset?

On to the roundup:

This will probably last just until the next Ecosystem update, which could be during the night or tomorrow morning sometime, but at the moment the top blog in the Ecosystem has linked to me. These flukes are fun. I wish I had a screen shot of when La Shawn was #1 and I was in the top ten, while Instapundit was barely on the map.

I've had no truly interesting searches since Thursday, so we'll go right on to the roundup:

Captain's Quarters questions some mistaken reports about what the Iraq Survey Group has said. They have a little footnote indicating that the evidence is inconclusive on whether WMD were transported unofficially outside Iraq before the fighting began on the ground. Apparently it's being reported as a claim that no WMD were thus transported, which is certainly inaccurate as a reflection of what ISG said. See also Considerettes.

Also at the Considerettes: Now that Republicans have taken over in Georgia for the first time since Reconstruction, the Jim Crow laws have been officially repealed.

Joe Carter has a thought experiment to test some ethical premises in the stem cell debate. What if we could extract certain crucial compounds from human embryos by mass-producing them, boiling them up in a soup, and eating them as a cure for all sorts of currently incurable conditions?

Zach Wendling has a nice post at In the Agora about one true statement conservatives often say. It's true that there's more forestation in the U.S. than there's been in something like 100 years. It's also true that this is a very misleading statement. I don't think most environmentalists will want to grant everything he says, and I know many conservatives will think he goes too far in the other direction, but I think this is a great post that just says what ought to be said.

Meanwhile, Paul Musgrave at In the Agora deals with an objection from Democrats that Republicans filibustered Abe Fortas' nomination for Chief Justice. His nomination was questionable apart from ideology, the filibuster is a completely different animal nowadays, and it's not necessarily hypocrisy to use a legal procedure while it's legal while thinking it should be made illegal (and the example he gives makes that absolutely clear).

Kentucky Packrat will be hosting the 68th Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and Perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

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