Meta-Blogging: March 2005 Archives

I've only had one interesting search in the past week, although a few people don't know how to spell T'Pol's name, and somehow they find me because of it. I suppose I should also mention that I'm getting scores of hits from people looking for an answer to why slavery is wrong, which is pretty funny given which posts they're turning up.

This other one that just leaves my scratching my head:

genesis sun close blacks

The first season of the new Battlestar Galactica show is coming to an end this Friday, but in case weren't aware of it, head writer and re-envisioner Ron Moore has a blog, which has his reflections throughout the season, and I'm sure he'll have things to say as the work on the next season continues. I know they've started filming, because Gateworld has pictures up already. I'm expecting even better things in the next season. The one spoiler I found out about the final episode sounds like it really has some excellent openings for some really interesting storytelling.

The 63rd Christian Carnival is at Weapon of Mass Distraction. As I say in every roundup, my highlights post for the carnival will come once I've had the time to look through it all. I'm hoping that will be quicker this week due to my not having to teach tomorrow.

Sick

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It's a good thing I'm sort of on Spring Break this week. After not sleeping even the minimal six hours most nights for a couple weeks while already having a cold, I'm in pretty bad shape. I can't move very quickly without a head rush, especially if it's vertical movement. I had to teach last night at the school that doesn't have off this week. It was a three-hour class, and I was already pretty sick and losing my voice beforehand, and then I had to talk for three hours. I was hoping to have at least one contentful post today, but I haven't had two hands free and the ability to sit down for long enough for most of the day. To top it all off, Isaiah just stuck his finger in my eye, and I can't see anything. So much for day one of my partial Spring Break.

Update: Apparently it's even worse to bend over than it is to go upstairs, but somehow going downstairs is fine. Any reason why that might be?

I can see again, but Sam just left for dance class, so I'm managing all three kids for a few hours, which usually takes all my energy even when I'm not in ultra-low energy mode. Then I'm be at Bible study later. That makes it unlikely that I'll post much else today unless the kids are fairly well-behaved and willing to entertain themselves. The only reason I'm writing this now is because Sophia's asleep, and the boys are in the bathtub for coal removal. They got into the barbecue coal on the back porch today. Then after I closed it up and brought them in they did it again when Sam insisted they'd be fine if the lid was on. I guess we can't rely on that lid anymore.

Weapon of Mass Distraction will be hosting the 63rd Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through this coming Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Christian Carnival LXII

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The 62nd Christian Carnival is at A Nutt's View. My contribution is Mark Roberts on the TNIV, Part I.

I've already linked to the bloke in the outer's post on Rick Warren in this post.

The Bible Archive reflects on I Peter 3:7. You husbands in the same way, live with your wives in an understanding way, as with someone weaker, since she is a woman; and show her honor as a fellow heir of the grace of life, so that your prayers will not be hindered. Most discussions of this verse deal with whether the weaker vessel language that this translation hides is misgynistic. Rey instead focuses on the second half of the verse. Not showing honor to a believing wife hinders prayers.

I Was Just Thinking... points out something that often disturbs me. It's one thing to acknowledge that we're imperfect in full honesty and humility. It's quite another to delight in it and wear it as a badge of honor. There's even a fine line between the two. At the end of Philippians 3, Paul describes the enemies of Christ glorying in their shame. The first section of Ephesians 5 describes the deeds the believers Paul was writing to had formerly walked in, saying it's shameful even to speak of them in private. It's shameful to treat our being like the world as something to be proud of. How backwards is that?

Philosophers' Carnival XI

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The eleventh Philosophers' Carnival is at the only official blog of Clayton Littlejohn. My Heteronormative is part of it.

Patrick at Prior Knowledge has an example inspired by the Pleasure Machine case that's supposed to take our intuitions the other direction. I couldn't figure out which of three interpretations of his example he'd intended, so I responded to all three at OrangePhilosophy.

Chris Panza at Metatome has an interesting post worrying about how ethics instructors teach ethics and whether it just fosters relativism in the simplistic "who's to say?" form. I reflected a little bit on the conversation that ensued in this post.

Strange ways people found my blog this past week:

least anti-white country

does microwave popcorn go bad

Rick warren and scientology (that one must have left them a bit unsatisfied)

wrong doings of President Monroe, which led to this post of all things

The tenth Vox Apologia (apologetics carnival) is up at RazorsKiss. Unlike most carnivals, this one has a theme or topic each week, and this week's was Presuppositional Apologetics: Target Audience. Presuppositional Apologetics presupposes the existence of God. Who is this style of apologetics best suited for, and why? Who is it NOT suited for?

With such a specific topic, you might expect a small carnival, but I didn't expect it to be this small. There are only two entries. My Presuppositional Apologetics argues against the idea of presuppositional apologetics, at least as it's normally construed. The other entry is Counter-cult Apologetics' Presuppositional Apologetics. I agree with much of what Jeff gives as the basis for presuppositionalism, but I don't think that genuinely leads to what he concludes. I also disagree with a number of his statements along the way.

Christian Carnival LXI

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The 61st Christian Carnival is at ChristWeb. My contribution is The Moral Value of Meanings of Words.

I've already discussed the posts at Evangelical Outpost and In the Agora on whether libertarians should oppose laws against blackmail.

I've also commented on PlaidBerry's post on pessimism.

A Nutt's View will be hosting the 62nd Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through today, Tuesday).

Then do the following:

This Title is False

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For my 1050th post, I'd just like to make a quick announcement:

When I report that a certain post is post #1050, or something like that, I'm not telling the truth, at least not straightforwardly. MT counts every post when it gives me the totals, and one of the posts it counts is a draft post Wink started months ago that he never finished. So I still have one more post to go after this one before my 1050th published post appears.

Of course, if you really want to know what my 1050th post on this blog is, you'll need to subtract all of Wink's posts (and of course that post hasn't happened yet), and if you want to figure out which post is my 1050th post in general, then you need to add in all the OrangePhilosophy and Prosblogion posts (and I'm still not sure if it's happened yet, but I'm not about to do that).

So I just wanted to be forthright and honest about this. I've been lying about all this for a while. Well, at least I've been counting "my _____ post" to mean something very particular, and it isn't the most obvious meaning.

Kevin at Short Attention Span asked me to comment on his post that raises some worries about how little prominence Christian blogs have in the blogosphere. I think my Bootstrapping Blogs post deals with some of what he's asking, and I won't repeat that here. I did have some things to say, and since Ektopos was down for something like an hour tonight right when I wanted to say something, I just left a few comments there, which was difficult due to the 1000-character limit of the free version of Haloscan. I'll expand on those comments here.

First, the searches of the week.

most hopeless search: unitarians same as muslims

almost as bad: how to get over a dead cat (the result turned up my post on the woman who cloned her dead cat)

This one isn't biased, is it?: post-trib heresy

Don't ask: ARMINIAN SEX

I don't even know what to say about this one: democrat terrorist traitor feminist racist affirmative action lesbians

Then there was the referral I got from stoics genetic engineering

Over a year ago I posted about a weird search that brought someone to Sam's blog [organization of telepathy in Pakistan]. Well, almost the same search took someone yesterday to that very post of mine. In the post, I had asked what whoever had searched for that could possibly have been searching for. This person left a comment answering the question. [Update: I just realized this is the second time something like this has happened. The second time I talked about this sort of search is here.]

Favorite search of the week looking for someone thinking a pejorative expression refers to a good thing: Playing god a good thing

Allthings2all has put together The Science and Christianity Showcase, an excellent collection of posts from Christian bloggers about the relation between science and Christianity, excluding anything on creation and evolution at least partly because a recent Apologetics Carnival dealt with that subject (but I get the sense it's also because all these other issues tend to get sidelined by creation/evolution whenever the topic of Christianity and science comes up). Since there was no expectation that submissions should be recent posts, I submitted my All Creation Groans from almost a year ago. Three posts struck me as worth highlighting:

Sun and Shield has a nice overview of the main themes throughout scripture on the use of our abilities to make things and to explore and learn about God's cration, thus providing a basic biblical theology of science and technology. As with anything good, people can use it as an instrumental bad, and he spends some time listing some ways that can happen, with examples of each from the biblical record.

Blogotional develops some of the same themes, focusing in on the value of science for the Christian as a way to explore what God has done.

A Physicist's Perspective also covers some of the same ground. One intriguing argument in his post is that what we do in science is something God commanded Adam to do before the fall. He also emphasizes the rationality of the world and the God who made it, which encourages us to use science as a rational means of understanding it.

ChristWeb will be hosting the 61st Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through today, Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Christian Carnival LX

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The 60th Christian Carnival is at Belief Seeking Understanding. It contains my Genesis and Objections to Old Earth Cosmology.

Allthings2all offers a corrective for the idea that Christianity should frown on science. She lists many incredible things about science and how it's a tool given by God to understand the world he created. She also announces the Science and Christianity Showcase coming up. There's still a very short amount of time to submit posts for that. The deadline is midnight tonight, so get cracking.

wacky search of the day: ralph nader preterist

ridiculously exaggerated search of the day: 1000 reasons why premarital sex is bad

Both of those were actually yesterday, but that's when I put most of this post together.

Belief Seeking Understanding will be hosting the 60th Christian Carnival this week. The Christian Carnival is a weekly collection of some of the best posts of the Christian blogosphere. It's open to Christians of Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic convictions. One of the goals of this carnival is to offer our readers to a broad range of Christian thought. This is a great way to make your writing more well known and perhaps pick up some regular readers.

To enter is simple. First, your post should be of a Christian nature, but this does not exclude posts that are about home life, politics, or current events from a Christian point of view. Second, please submit only one post dated since the last Christian Carnival (i.e. from last Wednesday through today, Tuesday).

Then do the following:

Christian Carnival LIX

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The 59th Christian Carnival is at Crossroads: Where Faith and Inquiry Meet. My Slavery and Christianity post finds its place there under the category of Days of Our Lives (yes, Diane finally did the unthinkable and used soap operas as the theme for the Christian Carnival). I was hoping for The Young and the Restless, because that's the one Tyr Anasazi is now on. I saw him on it last week when flipping channels, and he's just not the same without the hair or the Nietzchean bones protruding from his forearms. At least Days of Our Lives was in Bill and Ted's first movie, in the same scene with Kansas and Socrates, so it keeps good company.

The tenth Philosophers' Carnival is up at E.G. I'm represented by Abortion and Coercion.

Ineffective Searches

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This is post #1025 for this blog, and I wanted to take the opportunity to say something of very little consequence that bothers me far more than it's worth. Occasionally I wonder what people might be searching for when they turn up my site. Sometimes I feel sorry that they didn't find what they were looking for. Sometimes I take great delight in the fact that they get this post when searching for something about moms having sex with their daughters (and this happens at least a few times a day, sometimes much more frequently). Sometimes the way a search is phrased, I can tell they're looking for confirmation of some controversial claim that I can't imagine any motivation to search for that isn't thoroughly immoral, e.g. the person who searched early this morning for vocabulary level of people who are against affirmative action. It saddens me that someone would even search for something like that, because the assumption seems to me to stem from complete idiocy, but I hope the person learned that the affirmative action issue isn't as clear-cut as they originally assumed, since it led to one of the most balanced posts I've written on the subject.

Sometimes, however, it just seems obvious to me that they should know better than to search for something. Sometimes there's just nothing to be found, because the nature of what they're searching for is such that there's no information on it. I got a hit from the following AOL search last night: john locke's view on gay marriage. I'm sure such a search might provide lots of nice information on the gay marriage debate, perhaps with some helpful principles from John Locke, who was a pretty good political philosopher (even though I think he was downright awful at metaphysics and not that great at epistemology, both of which he helped send in entirely the wrong direction for hundreds of years, despite Leibniz's attempts to retain the advances of the medievals that we've only in the last forty years recovered, e.g. their advanced modal logic and the de re/de dicto distinction that showed what was wrong with anti-essentialist arguments from Locke to Quine, all of which were in Leibniz's criticisms of Locke and which he'd gotten from the medievals).

Whatever you think of Locke's work, I don't see how it's even possible to find information about his view on gay marriage, at least not without also being able to discover what he thought about the United Nations or special relativity.

Spell-Checker Omissions

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Matthew has just installed a spell-checking plugin to MT for the Ektopos blogs, so now I can see spell-checking suggestions for any post I type. These are only listed when I preview a post, so I have to go back and find the words it doesn't recognize, which isn't as convenient for long posts as something like the Microsoft Word feature, which locates it itself. The nice part of this, though, is that I don't have it inconveniently telling me real words aren't real words unless I go check it.

A longer post I've been working on this morning has a few words it doesn't recognize, but there's one that stands out as pretty serious omission for a spell-checking plugin designed for a blogging platform, and another one showed up in this post: 'blogs' and 'blogging' aren't in the plugin's database. I'm a little surprised that a spell-checking plugin designed specifically for blogging software doesn't even recognize 'blogs' and 'blogging' as real words. It probably uses some already existing database, but it's still a little strange.

The 58th Christian Carnival is at Wallo World. I count 56 entries, not quite enough to equal the number of this edition of the carnival. It includes my Mark Tidbits 4: Mark's High Christology. Also, I've been working on a series on slavery spurred on by Back of the Envelope's two posts on slavery and Christianity, so I'll say no more about that here.

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